Older people

Older people

Older people

Introduction

Our Covid-19 Action Fund provided grants for Churchill Fellows to run projects combating the effects of Covid-19 in all areas of society. Hundreds of pandemic projects nationwide are being run or assisted by Churchill Fellows, using the international expertise they gained during their Fellowships overseas. Here are the Action Fund recipients working on issues relating to older people.

January 2022 awards

Clair Chapwell: engaging older people in storytelling

Clair Chapwell (CF 2013) from London is a freelance creative facilitator. During the pandemic, Clair has been facilitating an online weekly writing session for adults aged over 70 called Lockdown Lunch.

Clair will use her grant to extend this project so that she can continue to facilitate sessions for older people experiencing social isolation as a result of Covid-19. Clair will offer weekly two-hour writing sessions where participants will write prose and poetry exploring issues that resonate for them. Participants will be assigned a new theme each week that will help them to explore and express difficult areas of their past and present life. Clair plans to facilitate live readings of their work in community venues, where older people can meet and connect in person. She will also facilitate recordings of some of the stories as podcasts to be shared on social media. Clair hopes that Lockdown Lunch will continue to be a safe space where individuals share their experiences and form relationships with others.

Clair’s Fellowship to the USA in 2013 explored participatory arts projects for LGBTQ+ and older people. It was supported by The Baring Foundation.

Fred Horley: improving digital inclusion among older people

Fred Horley (CF 1992) from Plymouth in Devon is a former Age Concern IT tutor volunteer, where he taught older people how to use computers.

Fred will use his grant to establish a digital inclusion hub within Glenholt Seniors Lunch Club, where he is a member. He has seen that members have increasingly felt left behind during the move to digital communication, which has been heightened during the pandemic. Fred will integrate a training programme into the existing lunch club, by offering informal drop-in sessions where members can learn and develop their IT skills. This will help them to communicate with distant friends and family members, access online GP services, navigate online library services and shop for essential items. Fred hopes that this will increase older people’s confidence when using technology and reduce feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Fred’s Fellowship to the USA in 1992 explored best practice in energy conservation and schemes to reduce fuel poverty.

Ann Pascoe: supporting carers looking after older people

Ann Pascoe (CF 2012) from Helmsdale in the Highlands is the founder of Dementia Friendly Communities, a charity that provides a circle of support for older people, including individuals and families living with dementia. During the pandemic, Ann developed a pilot programme to support unpaid carers looking after their loved ones.

Ann will use her grant to continue this project and reach more people, especially those who are at risk of social isolation due to Covid-19. This will form part of a support package that will include attending appointments, assistance with shopping, help with meal preparation and carrying out household chores. Ann is keen to reach those who do not identify themselves as carers. She will set up a campaign targeting 7,500 households across her local area, using direct mailings and social media advertising. Ann will also launch a website that will outline full details of the services offered, which she will share with local organisations, community groups and service providers to help spread the word. Ann hopes that this will provide respite to carers and help to reduce feelings of isolation.

Ann’s Fellowship to India and Taiwan in 2012 explored ways of improving dementia care and carer wellbeing by enabling laypeople to detect early signs of dementia.

January 2022 awards

Clair Chapwell: engaging older people in storytelling

Clair Chapwell (CF 2013) from London is a freelance creative facilitator. During the pandemic, Clair has been facilitating an online weekly writing session for adults aged over 70 called Lockdown Lunch.

Clair will use her grant to extend this project so that she can continue to facilitate sessions for older people experiencing social isolation as a result of Covid-19. Clair will offer weekly two-hour writing sessions where participants will write prose and poetry exploring issues that resonate for them. Participants will be assigned a new theme each week that will help them to explore and express difficult areas of their past and present life. Clair plans to facilitate live readings of their work in community venues, where older people can meet and connect in person. She will also facilitate recordings of some of the stories as podcasts to be shared on social media. Clair hopes that Lockdown Lunch will continue to be a safe space where individuals share their experiences and form relationships with others.

Clair’s Fellowship to the USA in 2013 explored participatory arts projects for LGBTQ+ and older people. It was supported by The Baring Foundation.

Fred Horley: improving digital inclusion among older people

Fred Horley (CF 1992) from Plymouth in Devon is a former Age Concern IT tutor volunteer, where he taught older people how to use computers.

Fred will use his grant to establish a digital inclusion hub within Glenholt Seniors Lunch Club, where he is a member. He has seen that members have increasingly felt left behind during the move to digital communication, which has been heightened during the pandemic. Fred will integrate a training programme into the existing lunch club, by offering informal drop-in sessions where members can learn and develop their IT skills. This will help them to communicate with distant friends and family members, access online GP services, navigate online library services and shop for essential items. Fred hopes that this will increase older people’s confidence when using technology and reduce feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Fred’s Fellowship to the USA in 1992 explored best practice in energy conservation and schemes to reduce fuel poverty.

Ann Pascoe: supporting carers looking after older people

Ann Pascoe (CF 2012) from Helmsdale in the Highlands is the founder of Dementia Friendly Communities, a charity that provides a circle of support for older people, including individuals and families living with dementia. During the pandemic, Ann developed a pilot programme to support unpaid carers looking after their loved ones.

Ann will use her grant to continue this project and reach more people, especially those who are at risk of social isolation due to Covid-19. This will form part of a support package that will include attending appointments, assistance with shopping, help with meal preparation and carrying out household chores. Ann is keen to reach those who do not identify themselves as carers. She will set up a campaign targeting 7,500 households across her local area, using direct mailings and social media advertising. Ann will also launch a website that will outline full details of the services offered, which she will share with local organisations, community groups and service providers to help spread the word. Ann hopes that this will provide respite to carers and help to reduce feelings of isolation.

Ann’s Fellowship to India and Taiwan in 2012 explored ways of improving dementia care and carer wellbeing by enabling laypeople to detect early signs of dementia.