Carers in rural areas

Carers in rural areas

Carers in rural areas

Introduction

Dementia is an issue everywhere, but in rural areas the issue is exacerbated because many people are older and more isolated. Two thirds of people with dementia are based in rural areas, and 56% of the rural population are in older age groups.

2020 Award

Ann Pascoe (CF 2012) is a dementia specialist and a carer for her husband, who was diagnosed with vascular dementia in 2006. At the time, she had very little understanding of the challenges and stigma surrounding the condition and there was limited support available in the rural area where she lived in the Highlands. Following her Fellowship, Ann founded a local charity, Dementia Friendly Communities (DFC), with the aim of recognising and embracing the challenges a life with dementia presents to the families affected.

Ann has been awarded one of our Activate grants to set up and run a pilot programme to support carers in rural areas in the Scottish Highlands, enabling them to reconnect with their communities while continuing in their caring roles. This pilot programme will ensure that carers have access to immediate physical and emotional support within their local community, bringing carers and communities together. By creating a model that enables more tailored support, Ann hopes carers will be able to take time away from their day to day routines and responsibilities, while creating opportunities for them to connect and contribute their skills to their community. Her team will also develop a carers’ pack, for distribution in hospitals and GP surgeries, which will signpost them to available local community services. Ann will gather evidence from this pilot to include in the Highland Carer Strategy, developed by NHS Highland in keeping with Scottish Government’s carer initiatives.

Ann’s Fellowship to India and Taiwan explored best practice in enabling laypeople to detect early symptoms of dementia and carer stress.

2020 Award

Ann Pascoe (CF 2012) is a dementia specialist and a carer for her husband, who was diagnosed with vascular dementia in 2006. At the time, she had very little understanding of the challenges and stigma surrounding the condition and there was limited support available in the rural area where she lived in the Highlands. Following her Fellowship, Ann founded a local charity, Dementia Friendly Communities (DFC), with the aim of recognising and embracing the challenges a life with dementia presents to the families affected.

Ann has been awarded one of our Activate grants to set up and run a pilot programme to support carers in rural areas in the Scottish Highlands, enabling them to reconnect with their communities while continuing in their caring roles. This pilot programme will ensure that carers have access to immediate physical and emotional support within their local community, bringing carers and communities together. By creating a model that enables more tailored support, Ann hopes carers will be able to take time away from their day to day routines and responsibilities, while creating opportunities for them to connect and contribute their skills to their community. Her team will also develop a carers’ pack, for distribution in hospitals and GP surgeries, which will signpost them to available local community services. Ann will gather evidence from this pilot to include in the Highland Carer Strategy, developed by NHS Highland in keeping with Scottish Government’s carer initiatives.

Ann’s Fellowship to India and Taiwan explored best practice in enabling laypeople to detect early symptoms of dementia and carer stress.