Dementia sensory support

Dementia sensory support

Dementia sensory support

Introduction

Some 850,000 people in the UK live with dementia. Many of them experience related sensory changes, particularly with hearing and sight. However, there is little information and support available for this. Many living with dementia don’t realise that it affects more than memory, and professionals in the audiology and ophthalmology fields lack the information they need to best support patients with sensory challenges.

2021 Award

Agnes Houston (CF 2016) has lived with dementia for 14 years, which affects her senses, causing hyperacusis and vision and balance issues. Unable to find relevant support and hearing the same from many others, Agnes published a book, Talking Sense, detailing learnings from her Fellowship around living with dementia and sensory changes. The book has been very well received and is published in several languages as well as online and in audio version.

Agnes has been awarded one of our Activate grants to develop the learnings in her book into an online course for people affected by dementia and their carers, providing information and support on related sensory changes. She will use her funding to develop online resources, with the support of an online learning assistant, which will help people to identify their sensory changes, learn more about coping strategies, and discover how to seek help. She will evaluate the course and share learnings with professionals. In addition, she will provide information for audiologists and ophthalmologists through workshops, a published guide and a short video tailored for each profession, based on learning from people living with dementia. She hopes to build a resource that will benefit future generations of people living with dementia and the professionals working to support them.

Agnes’ Fellowship to Canada and Ireland investigated the experiences and coping strategies of people living with dementia and sensory challenges.

2021 Award

Agnes Houston (CF 2016) has lived with dementia for 14 years, which affects her senses, causing hyperacusis and vision and balance issues. Unable to find relevant support and hearing the same from many others, Agnes published a book, Talking Sense, detailing learnings from her Fellowship around living with dementia and sensory changes. The book has been very well received and is published in several languages as well as online and in audio version.

Agnes has been awarded one of our Activate grants to develop the learnings in her book into an online course for people affected by dementia and their carers, providing information and support on related sensory changes. She will use her funding to develop online resources, with the support of an online learning assistant, which will help people to identify their sensory changes, learn more about coping strategies, and discover how to seek help. She will evaluate the course and share learnings with professionals. In addition, she will provide information for audiologists and ophthalmologists through workshops, a published guide and a short video tailored for each profession, based on learning from people living with dementia. She hopes to build a resource that will benefit future generations of people living with dementia and the professionals working to support them.

Agnes’ Fellowship to Canada and Ireland investigated the experiences and coping strategies of people living with dementia and sensory challenges.