Parents and carers affected by youth violence

Parents and carers affected by youth violence

Parents and carers affected by youth violence

Introduction

Cases of serious youth violence and child murder are rising in London, particularly amongst disadvantaged communities – including communities of colour and communities that have been exposed to Adverse Childhood Experiences. Often these communities struggle to engage with statutory services due to experiences of systemic injustice, racism and distrust, leaving thousands of parents and carers to live daily with the untreated effects of trauma, PTSD and other fallout from losing their family members to serious youth violence.

2021 Award

Tracey Ford (CF 2012) is the founder of JAGS Foundation, which provides services and safe spaces for communities affected by serious youth violence in south-west London. Tracey set up the organisation following the murder of her teenage son James in 2007.

Tracey has been awarded one of our Activate grants to conduct research for the development of a peer-led, self-help support service targeted at parents and carers affected by serious youth violence in south-west London. Tracey will use the funding to carry out interviews, gathering testimonials and case studies from bereaved parents, carers and teachers within the local community, in order to ascertain the tools, information, resources and support services that people really need, both to prevent cases of serious youth violence and also to respond in a time of crisis. She will also recruit a professional website developer to build an interactive website through which to offer these preventative and responsive tools and resources. Through this, Tracey hopes to develop a virtual space where these self-help tools, including community discussion forums and peer support sessions, are available at all times, providing routes to trusted professionals and lived-experience peer support.

Tracey’s Fellowship to Canada and South Africa explored how to improve restorative justice practices for young people.

2021 Award

Tracey Ford (CF 2012) is the founder of JAGS Foundation, which provides services and safe spaces for communities affected by serious youth violence in south-west London. Tracey set up the organisation following the murder of her teenage son James in 2007.

Tracey has been awarded one of our Activate grants to conduct research for the development of a peer-led, self-help support service targeted at parents and carers affected by serious youth violence in south-west London. Tracey will use the funding to carry out interviews, gathering testimonials and case studies from bereaved parents, carers and teachers within the local community, in order to ascertain the tools, information, resources and support services that people really need, both to prevent cases of serious youth violence and also to respond in a time of crisis. She will also recruit a professional website developer to build an interactive website through which to offer these preventative and responsive tools and resources. Through this, Tracey hopes to develop a virtual space where these self-help tools, including community discussion forums and peer support sessions, are available at all times, providing routes to trusted professionals and lived-experience peer support.

Tracey’s Fellowship to Canada and South Africa explored how to improve restorative justice practices for young people.