Critical care readmissions

Critical care readmissions

Critical care readmissions

Introduction

Following discharge from hospital after a critical care admission, many patients return to hospital under emergency circumstances. This can have a significant impact on the individual, their family and the NHS.

2020 Award

Joanne McPeake (CF 2011) is a nurse consultant based in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. As a result of her Fellowship, Joanne developed the first Patient and Family Advisory Council in the UK, which provided a forum for patients and families to suggest improvements in quality and safety for hospital processes, and has enabled understanding of the challenges that patients and caregivers face during and following critical care. Working with other members of the multidisciplinary team in the ICU in Glasgow, Joanne has also helped to create InS:PIRE (Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to Employment), an innovative five-week integrated health and social care rehabilitation programme for ICU survivors. In 2016, this model of care was scaled up to another five sites across four health boards in Scotland, in partnership with The Health Foundation and the Scottish government.

Joanne has been awarded one of our Activate grants to launch a project to explore the reasons for this, and to reduce the rate of readmission. Additionally, Joanne aims to improve the transition from hospital to home for patients. She will interview patients, caregivers and NHS staff across different hospitals, in order to understand how this renewed contact with the NHS could have been avoided. The main output from this study will be the creation of an integrated pathway for critically ill patients leaving the acute hospital setting.

Joanne’s Fellowship to the USA explored how to improve outcomes for patients recovering from a period of critical illness.

2020 Award

Joanne McPeake (CF 2011) is a nurse consultant based in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. As a result of her Fellowship, Joanne developed the first Patient and Family Advisory Council in the UK, which provided a forum for patients and families to suggest improvements in quality and safety for hospital processes, and has enabled understanding of the challenges that patients and caregivers face during and following critical care. Working with other members of the multidisciplinary team in the ICU in Glasgow, Joanne has also helped to create InS:PIRE (Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to Employment), an innovative five-week integrated health and social care rehabilitation programme for ICU survivors. In 2016, this model of care was scaled up to another five sites across four health boards in Scotland, in partnership with The Health Foundation and the Scottish government.

Joanne has been awarded one of our Activate grants to launch a project to explore the reasons for this, and to reduce the rate of readmission. Additionally, Joanne aims to improve the transition from hospital to home for patients. She will interview patients, caregivers and NHS staff across different hospitals, in order to understand how this renewed contact with the NHS could have been avoided. The main output from this study will be the creation of an integrated pathway for critically ill patients leaving the acute hospital setting.

Joanne’s Fellowship to the USA explored how to improve outcomes for patients recovering from a period of critical illness.